Flu Vaccine

Get Vaccinated Against Flu


CDHD offers flu vaccine for children six months old through 18 years old. We do not offer adult flu vaccine.



The single best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu vaccine each year. There are three* types of vaccines:

  • The flu shot: An inactivated vaccine (containing killed virus) that is given with a needle. The flu shot is approved for use in people 6 months of age and older, including healthy people and people with chronic medical conditions.
  • The nasal-spray flu vaccine: A vaccine made with live, weakened flu viruses that do not cause the flu (sometimes called LAIV for “Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine”). LAIV is approved for use in healthy people 2 years to 49 years of age who are not pregnant. *Note: Nasal spray is not recommended for use during the 2016-17 season. Learn more (CDC)
  • Intradermal flu vaccine: The intradermal flu vaccine is a shot that is injected into the skin instead of the muscle. The intradermal flu vaccine is approved for use in adults 18 through 64 years of age.

About two weeks after vaccination, antibodies develop that protect against influenza virus infection. Flu vaccines will not protect against flu-like illnesses caused by non-influenza viruses.

When to get vaccinated

October or November is the best time to get vaccinated, but getting vaccinated in December or even later can still be beneficial since most influenza activity occurs in January or later in most years. Though it varies, flu season can last as late as May.

Who should get vaccinated

Everyone 6 months and older is recommended for annual flu vaccination with rare exception. For the 2016-2017 season, CDC recommends use of injectable flu vaccines — inactivated influenza vaccine (or IIV) or the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not be used during 2016-2017.

The CDC provides a list of all people recommended to get a flu vaccine, who can and can’t get the flu shot and who should take precautions or talk to their doctor or other health care professional before vaccination. Learn More

Talk to your health care provider if you have any questions regarding which flu vaccine is best for you and your family.

Who should not be vaccinated

Some people should not be vaccinated without first consulting a physician. They include:

  • People who have a severe allergy to chicken eggs.
  • People who have had a severe reaction to an influenza vaccination in the past.
  • People who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) within 6 weeks of getting an influenza vaccine previously.
  • Children less than 6 months of age (influenza vaccine is not approved for use in this age group).
  • People who have a moderate or severe illness with a fever should wait to get vaccinated until their symptoms lessen.

If you have questions about whether you should get a flu vaccine, consult your health care provider.

Additional Resources

Vaccine Information Statements

Contact

Immunization Contacts

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